Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

Minelab has released the new metal detectors 2017 – Minelab Go-Find 22, Minelab Go-Find 44, and Minelab Go-Find 66. Each of the three new models comes in two color options… So it appears that there are 6 new products?

Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2017

Minelab liked how warmly you had welcomed their new Go-Find series detectors. And especially for you, the kind and loyal fans, these machines have been upgraded.

An upgrade in the full sense of this word: from software to external appearance – these are completely different units. A square search coil is the thing that has remained.

Previous deficiencies have been rectified. The upgraded Go-Find detectors now have an armrest. However, the manufacturer still think that these devices are equipped with an ageless coil, so the latter can’t be replaced. The Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66 come with a Моnо coil. The Go-Find 44 and Go-Find 66 models have a 10-inch loop, whereas the Minelab Go-Find 22 comes with an 8-inch one. The coil cable is hidden inside the shaft.

Well, let’s ask about the main thing: how do things stand with water submersion of Minelab’s new detectors? How much will they cost? Or aren’t you interested in it? All about the new machines will be collected here – Minelab Go-Find 22, Minelab Go-Find 44, and Minelab Go-Find 66.


Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

All about the Minelab Go-Find 44 is collected here (news, tests, comparisons with other devices, different reviews and opinions). Plus, on Knowledgebase pages there is additional information you should know before buying the Minelab Go-Find 44. The experience of others will help you save your time and money. Happy hunting to everyone!

Share to Facebook

19 Responses to Minelab Go-Find 22, Go-Find 44, Go-Find 66. NEW 2018

  • You can purchase a 22,44,66 at cabelas right now. On difference, all I can find is a statement saying they improved on the old versions and updated technology. Read the cabelas’ description further and it sounds exactly like the previous 20,40,60 except I find no mention of GPS or bluetooth phone connections. Prices seem about the same as the previous versions were, or still are, at various outlets. Can’t find a 66 at KellyCo I guess but they have a 60 for a 10 dollar savings. No mention of future ability to upgrade software like pretty much anything digital made today outside this hobby. Maybe it has all that, but why wouldn’t they share that information up front? Do these questions even matter to many of you jaded pros who looked at the first Go Finds like toys for Tommy since you couldn’t swap the coils?

    I’m new and looking hard at getting into this hobby and reading watching all I can. I can tell you, I’m damn near stumped on what I would want to spend on penny on right now. When I ran into the Go Find series my initial thought was, why aren’t these still a big thing? Then I read on…

    The Go Find serious seems to have originally met with plenty of scrutiny over it being plasticy and although it working, the limits designed into its field usefulness put many people off. But many brands seem to be getting built with plenty of plastic now. I can find hundreds of videos of people showing those cheaper and initially newer tech Go Finds actually do find a great range of bounty. And then also plenty of people writing about how these are maybe only ok for your kid to start on. Isn’t finding stuff the point? Isn’t having an all around land detector that finds anything a good starting point for an adult? I don’t entirely get it. Oh I see, we can’t change the coils. That does suck. Why would they do that? It can detect on salt beaches and 80% of others being sold can’t and it’s even all plastic yet they didn’t waterproof the connections on these to fully go under? Why? These are its only real drawbacks I’ve read about. Oh, and you can’t manually futz with the ground balance. Sure hope they gave you that choice in this upgrade at least.

    Let’s talk about plastic for a minute. Does anyone believe that the new plastic EquiNox control stem isn’t breaking off the straight pole soon? Does that plastic make it a toy? How about the Nox battery being implanted forever in the plastic grip? When that stops taking a charge like your iphone battery did, what does a new sealed plastic control box/arm/battery cost? $675 or send it in for repair? As far as I can tell, the Go Find series was a technological step up, at least in controller, from much of the ancient controllers still being sold today, and in portability. Look at the XP Deus controller that is 9 years old now. These two models look like 2050 tech compared to many others. Sure enough, the Nox seems to be following suit now.

    Finding a way to make the Go Find series feel more sturdy shouldn’t have been that hard for a new model update. Better plastic or even Carbon Fiber? Carbon Fiber aftermarket replacement parts? I should sell em! Did Minelab think of it? What isn’t plasticy and generic feeling about the AT Pro or Max controller and the buck rodgers like 1980’s plastic case, screen and buttons? We spend hundreds on this stuff that is built like a cheap alarm clock? Yet I read countless supporting that unit, probably for the simple fact that it detects well enough and Garrett gave users the ability to swap Coils and made them waterproof. More good features the Nox is wisely including now. How did their previous versions not include such things? It’s actually kind of amazing what all the Go FInd 60 apparently could do when you look at other options. So why, if Minelab meant to update the Go Find series, would they not give users the simple ability to swap coil types like every other detector out there, and simply design the all plastic thing to go underwater? And if not doing so, why reissue it? Could have just slapped another name on it such as a National Geographic version I suppose if you really aren’t going to try to validate it more to sell more.

    The problem I’m having now is wondering if upgraded “software” on Go Finds will actually make them better or worse? Are these new ones going to be further embracing the “toy” theory about them now?

    Maybe I can get a Go Find and just plastic dip the whole thing until it’s waterproof for 8 feet since none of these manufactures are willing to sell a waterproof detector for less than $500. Waterproofing a couple feet being such a technological feat these days.

    I’m trying to get into this hobby and was looking to get one of the Go Find 60s as a cheap starter and backup detector right away for their insane portability, and then maybe add something that can also detect soaking wet. But I am seriously starting to get put off by the oldsckool snakeoil that maybe seems to be part of this industry of manufacturers or “sellers’ of these things. Each one is selling 15 different models. It’s hard to find information about what year detector models were made. Or which amazing acronym feature is simply ancient tech now or never worked in the first place. I’m seeing 10+ year old detectors still being sold for thousands right next to things coming out this month that “will obsolete every other detector out there” for $700. Meanwhile I can also see spitting images of these all cloned on Alibaba for peanuts and many of them were maybe sourced there originally. Could they possibly lower the MFP of some of this older junk out there some day? Or is all the new stuff the actual junk? There is really no way to tell at their website other than the prices they are charging for each, and that doesn’t really appear to tell a real story.

    New tech, new features? Wait a minute. Color screens, GPS mapping, downloadable maps, live waypoints to know where you have been, usb connections for data and updates! Fish detectors do that all! Some can even steer our boats for us. And yet all I get for $500 to $1000 comparatively is a “dumb” metal detector? Anyone ever think of programming an App for the monster computer phones available today to read the data coming from the coils? Mount one on your standard detector and get to swinging? They have great screens, batteries, computing power and all connect to earphones somehow. What kind of magic is this? Cheap cases even make them waterproof!. Shwing!

    I’ve found a number of forums where metal detectorists themselves seem to speak honestly about these things, sharing their experience anyway. I’m reading up a lot first. The dates and history of these posts talking about specific detectors seems to be the only way to find out how old some of these units are. I appreciate your articles, sarcastic ones even, MDHunter! The history of the XP Deus article really helped me to understand it’s age but really confused me about the industries’ other models all being stuck in yesteryear with almost purposeful limitations left in. No wonder XP still tries to charge over $1,000 for that 9 year old thing in a working full package. No one really forced them to do otherwise yet.

    I hope I can find more info on the new Go Find updates here or elsewhere soon.

    I’m really tempted to design my own folding carbon fiber setup based on the Go Finds(a taller one) and just attach someone’s new waterproof controller with standard coil connections for it. Maybe I’ll do it to a Max, AT Pro, or even a Nox and also find a way to make their Battery swappable. Maybe I need to go call that 3D printer kid and Android programmer kid and educate them about goofy underground detector requirements like being inversely proportional to the square of the distance. Or maybe go call up Plexus yourself and just cut these obsolete snake oil salesman right out of the loop already. Some of you long time detectors have put in some serious years and money and deserve something altogether better than all these different half baked models out there. Don’t you think?

    • Brian, you are prominent writer! I haven’t read such “epic writing” yet!
      You are right on many points, but from a side it looks like you are begging
      for Equinox at the price of Bounty Hunter Tracker IV!
      I wish I could have Equinox so cheap too! But it is hardly possible…
      You see only the “outside” of the “problem” I know what is “inside” this
      “problem”! “Inside” the situation is even worse than you can imagine!
      I can tell you for hours how metal detectors work and what grave mistakes
      their designers commited! Is that interesting to anyone? I think – no!
      So take my advice – buy ANY metall detector and get a “hands on”
      experience with it! When hands are busy the head has a rest!

  • Thanks ET. That is probably a wise suggestion about just diving in and concerning less about that what ifs. I’ll probably do just that to start. I am looking at this from the outside. Although the more insider info some of you share the more we can learn from you. Mistakes and features left out of these individual models are exactly what I as an outsider looking to join in wants to really know before spending what little money we have. It’s a sea of model discontent from what I’m seeing looking in.

    I’m still stoked to get into it and will take your advice to just pick one and think more on it later. But I see a Frankenstein model in my future so I can have something as portable as a Go Find that can also be adjustable as I’ve read is often needed.

    • Brian, I advise you to start THing with simple analogue device – Tesoro
      Compadre or Tesoro Mohave! They are really good detectors! I have
      Tesoro Compadre myself! When you understand if you like THing or not
      you can buy more expensive model and “the first” detector you will keep
      as “the second” detector at hand, there are some places where expensive
      metal detectors don’t work and that is true! Cheap analogue metal detectors
      work well in trash infested areas!

  • Analogue eh. Lifetime warranties sound nice.

  • Looks like I might get my hands on a used Tesoro from a local shop. Sounds like a go based on a phone call, but I’ll have to see it first. Salesguy kind of echoed your words ET. Although he also said not always great in trashy areas. But that its better to learn to manually discriminate, work the dials, and sounds. Dig the trash and learn the difference in a way you will remember, hah. Not in too big a rush given weather in my area.

    Any hints on how to travel by plane with these things?

  • Minelab GO-FIND 44 — $199

  • Minelab GO-FIND 66 — $249

  • GO-FIND 22 — $149

  • Nice Toys !!!

    What about “Toy-Find” instead of “Go-Find” ?

    Anyway, good Luck.

  • To je všechno pěkný,tyhle inovace jsou ale k ničemu,jen tahání uživatelům peníze z kapes za něco rádo by nového..Cívka je stále stejná,uvítal bych raději 2D žehličku pro skvělou separaci,a ta frekvence na který tenhle údajně inovovaný detektor jede (7,8kHz) a hledá kovy, je dnes při spousty technologie která se do detektorů zavádí,je jak z pravěku..

  • Does anyone know if they will work on wet sand as well as black sand. I can’t seem to find any spec info online and also the shop can’t seem to answer as yet.
    The reviews of the last models were mixed so I decided to not buy the 60.

  • I really hope that Minelab will make coil covers for the new Go-Find series.

  • My friend John bought the 60 last year . It was rubbish. I cant see him buying one of these. Minelab burning thier boats. 20,40,60 were so bad.Minelab should buy them back.

  • Is the depth better than the old units because I believe they didn’t go to deep?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *