Reviews

Comparing the 15 kHz & 30 kHz on gold. Why is high frequency necessary?

The so called “not diggable” signal can be given by anything – by both a rusty nail and a gold coin, everything depends on your machine and your experience. Below is a case in point, let’s take a look at a comparative test between two metal detectors: the DeepTech Vista Smart Plus operating at 15 kHz vs the DeepTech Vista Gold Gain working on 30 kHz. The test is being conducted in highly mineralized soil. Test target: a gold coin. Here you will find the answer to the why-does-a-detector-need-a-high-frequency question. Notice how the unit running at 15 kHz is detecting the coin. How often do you hear such signals while hunting? It’s the real classic of not diggable audio response! Continue reading

Nokta Anfibio 19 Nail Board Test. 2 coils

Among the Nokta Anfibio devices the Multi model, a triple-frequency machine, is of the greatest interest to hobby enthusiasts. While the single frequency Nokta Anfibio 19 and Nokta Anfibio 14, being cheaper though, are not yet getting the kind of attention they deserve from treasure hunters. Maybe the era of single frequency machines is really coming to an end? This isn’t a rhetorical question, just look at all the latest new products – switching between frequencies as well as an ability to get wet have become the necessary features modern metal detectors should have. So here’s a nail board test performed on the single frequency Nokta Anfibio 19 unit: Continue reading

New Quest Scuba Tector with discrimination feature. Novelty 2019

Why do a mini metal detector and a pinpointer need discrimination? The new idea that was created by Minelab in 2017 has gone further. Quest Metal Detectors has added the discrimination feature to its underwater mini Quest Scuba Tector machine and Quest XPointer PRO probe. Continue reading

Opening the Garrett PRO-Pointer AT Z-Lynk. In pictures: what’s inside

Here’s a pictorial review of the Garrett PRO-Pointer AT Z-Lynk teardown. It will surely come in useful for those who will be minded to repair their units themselves. By the way, the probe can be disassembled rather easily. You just should be mindful of pulling the rubber button out, like it is with all Garrett pinpointers, before removing the circuit board. Otherwise, you won’t be able to take the latter out of the probe or will simply damage the rubber grommet. Continue reading

Opening the XP 22.5 HF Ellipse coil (Minelab lost the patent race?)

Here’s a pictorial review of disassembling the new XP 22.5 HF Ellipse coil, white in color. That has turned out to be very interesting: unexpectedly, the things inside are a far cry from what they were thought to be. Did Minelab lose the patent race to XP? So, the Australian manufacturer is already working for the French one? Continue reading

1 2 3 84