Minelab

Cool 3D Printed Coil Cover for Minelab Go-Find

Not many people know that for the last few years Minelab has been trying to actively stand against manufacturers of aftermarket coils. Are you aware of what the production cost of a plastic coil cover is? Being sold for $20-$25 per unit, this accessory is actually a dime a dozen. And they are always in demand. Plus, coils, repair etc. Well, I think you’ve got it: the coils-accessories-repair business is up there with metal detector sales. The only thing is that Minelab has been fighting against the wrong entities. Now everyone can do a coil or a metal detecting accessory himself. And the most unpleasant thing for the original manufacturer is that homemade parts often look much better than the branded ones. Let’s take a look at such an example: a cool coil cover for the Minelab Go-Find machine. By the way, this one has been already mass produced and gone on sale. Hello Minelab! Continue reading

Minelab Equinox 800-600 VDI Numbers. Gold, chain, jewelry

The Minelab Equinox isn’t the magic machine – it’s not a secret anymore. You asked for an underwater X-Terra, you got it. Here’s some helpful info for all the owners: a big test of the Minelab Equinox 800 on gold and silver, a VDI list. The chart given will say much about your detector. Test targets: gold jewelry, various rings, pendants and earrings. Plus, a chain, coins and much more. If you are a current owner or a potential buyer of the Minelab Equinox 800-600, this test is a must-see – you’ll start digging foil at once. Continue reading

Comparison: Nokta Anfibio Multi vs Minelab Equinox. Depth test

Here’s a red hot depth test: the Nokta Anfibio Multi vs Minelab Equinox 800 comparison. These two are the real giants attracting huge interest from metal detector users. And if Fisher doesn’t release its smart machine (at a price tag up to $999) until spring, sure as hell these two only will become the favorites of the upcoming 2019 season. Continue reading

Minelab Equinox battery doesn’t work (water in battery compartment) +

The proud owner of the Minelab Equinox 600, nicknamed palangsi (dankowskidetectors.com) shared his sad story. His machine battery stopped charging after a few days of use, so he decided to send it in for a warranty repair. The post office, however, refused to accept the parcel because of its contents – the defective electronic device, plus a Li-ion battery. After informing Minelab of the situation created, palangsi opened his Minelab Equinox to remove the battery. But what he saw inside was appalling… Every Minelab Equinox 600/800/1000 owner should be aware of this! Continue reading

Minelab Pro-Find 35 vs XP MI-6. Depth comparison

On the one hand, it’s a usual comparative test of the Minelab Pro-Find 35, XP MI-6 and Garrett Pro-Pointer AT probes. All three of these units can be submerged in water, are relatively new (fresh models) and have won definite recognition from treasure hunters. Deservedly or not, this is of no interest to us at the moment. It’s the other side of the coin that is of interest. The XP MI-6 is very often called the extra deep device. But it doesn’t fully reflect the actual situation. Yes, the probe is deep enough, but not so deep that you overpay for it. Moreover, you should be aware that even the most expensive (feature packed, recognized, widely promoted etc.) pinpointers can miss targets. Are you surprised? Take a look at this short test – very informative, +25 to any detectorist’s karma guaranteed. Continue reading