Fisher F75 vs Garrett AT PRO. Comparison

In my opinion, the Fisher F75 comes equipped with one of the best armrests among ground metal detectors. The coil is perfect in terms of its features and very bad in terms of reliability. See the comparison: Fisher F75 vs Garrett AT PRO.


The Fisher F75 metal detector has all practical capabilities of the Garrett AT PRO (except for underwater search). In addition, the F75 has a threshold setting and a proper static mode. The F75 LTD version (as compared to my Garrett AT PRO) includes additional modes: Boost and Cache Locating Processes. This is what it looks like if you compare the features. In practice, the difference is more noticeable.


The Garrett AT PRO is often called an enhanced version of the Garrett ACE. A sort of: they added ground balance, VDI, a dynamic audio response, PRO mode and allowed the detector to become submerged in water… I don’t agree with that. Metal detecting quality of the Garrett AT PRO is considerably higher than this one of the Garrett ACE and it is immediately noticeable. Take, for instance, discrimination accuracy. But that’s only if you compare with the low-end detectors. Having tried the Fisher F75 you understand that discrimination of the Garrett AT PRO is at an average level.

The Fisher F75 is significantly superior to the Garrett AT PRO in discrimination accuracy; thus, with this machine, you dig a smaller number of holes where unwanted finds can be detected. In addition, the F75 processes signals faster. This gives it an advantage in situations when the finds are located close together and the responses given by them may overlap.


Both repeat the classical construction of ground search metal detectors: an S-shaped shaft dismountable in three parts, double fixing of connection joints, a replaceable coil, a cable wrapped around the shaft.


The Fisher F75 has the control box located on the handgrip. The one of the Garrett AT PRO is mounted on top of the shaft. The F75 handgrip is more convenient both in terms of shape and covering material. The covering of the Garrett AT PRO starts spinning on the shaft in course of time and is more susceptible to wear.

But I can easily reach any control button with my thumb while hunting with the Garrett AT PRO. It’s very convenient. All control is carried out with the same hand holding the metal detector.


In order to tune the Fisher F75, I have to put the shovel aside and use my second hand. And one more thing I very much dislike: when metal detectors are tuned not through the buttons (these ones are more practical, clearer and faster).


The identical power supply: 4 AA batteries. Only 2 AA (in new Fisher devices) can be better than this one. Personally, I don’t perceive the metal detectors with a 9V power supply (and certainly not with 2x9V).


Both detectors have 9-inch elliptical coils – the Fisher 11 DD Bi-Axial (11COIL-F75) and the Garrett 8.5×11 PROformance DD. Both coils are ones of the best the manufacturers have. But if there are no complaints to Garrett – the coil is really perfect; the Fisher coil does have its distinctive features.


Why doesn’t the manufacturer supply the F75 with the rubber washers? Due to them, the coil is firmly attached to the shaft and, at the same time, can easily change the angle relative to the horizon. With no rubber washers, you have to tighten the coil bolt harder. This will ultimately cause the bolt to break. Furthermore, the Fisher F75 coil bolt is noticeably thinner than the one of the Garrett AT PRO.
I had to put the finishing touches on this F75 coil. A joint on the coil may cause penetration of moisture. Why does Fisher allow this?


The working face of the F75 coil is closed with a cover. The face of the Garrett AT PRO coil has a solid sealing. In my practice, I consider the second option to be more reliable. With the lapse of time, the cover may start letting moisture inside.


Share to Facebook

4 Responses to Fisher F75 vs Garrett AT PRO. Comparison

  • Owning and using both the F75 and the AT Pro I can add a few comments. The F75 is also much deeper than the AT Pro. A good depth on a coin in good conditions is 10 inches for a good repeatable signal. I use the 5×8 coil on the AT Pro and the Stock coil for my F75. This seems to be a great setup and the machines compliment each other. I will say the build of the F75 exceeds that of the AT Pro.You mentioned the F75 better at discriminating targets. That is questionable as the AT Pro has the Iron Audio function that will keep you from digging deep iron targets. Last I think the AT Pro is better balanced and lighter than the F75. If your gonna swing all day in a park, the AT Pro does the job. I also agree about wearing the head phones as the AT Pro headphones have volume control knobs.

    • John, you will find the F75 lighter than the AT PRO, look at the weights, and yes its a deeper machine for sure.

  • All I know is I love my AT Pro. If there are better machines so be it. I’m a Garrett fan since i purchased mine 4 months ago. As far as going deep? Mine hit a wheat penny 16in down loud and clear. Target separation? Outstanding! I’m completely satisfied with the Garrett ATPro!!

    • Luv the at pro. But in my test garden the pro wouldnt hit on a 8 or 10 in quarter. My f75 nails them up to 12 in with perfect vdis. Never sell my at pro. I found 3 artillery shells with it last year. Its good for 6 or 7 inches. But when you have all the good stuff cleared, its time to get the deep stuff with the f75. Both awsome, just better at diff tings. Nothing beats the at for the first 6 inches. Unfortunately thats not where all the good finds are.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Top secret of Garrett AT PRO. Video